Two Tuesday Quotes, Plus Two: Burroughs, Dukakis, Feinstein and Barnes


In memory of the teens shot at Ohio’s Chardon High School.

Opinions vary regarding the degree of gun control needed to ensure a free and safe society so here are four quotes which address the concern. Feinstein’s begs the question of whether we have a fundamental right to “feel safe” and whether not having guns affords that right. In my opinion her quote cannot be supported through constitutional or other logical means. Regardless, the debate will continue.

After a shooting spree, they always want to take the guns away from the people who didn’t do it. I sure as hell wouldn’t want to live in a society where the only people allowed guns are the police and the military.
– William S. Burroughs

I do not believe in people owning guns. Guns should be owned only by the police and military. I am going to do everything I can to disarm this state.
– Michael Dukakis

Banning guns addresses a fundamental right of all Americans to feel safe.
– Dianne Feinstein

Should we have background checks, waiting periods? To drive a car you have to pass a test that shows you know how to drive your car safely, you should have to do the same thing with guns.
– Michael D. Barnes

About Burroughs:

‘Naked Lunch’ made Burroughs an underground celebrity, and is widely considered his best work. He would go on to write many more books, plays, film scripts and essays. He went through a “cut-up” phase after ‘Naked Lunch’ during which he tried to compose novels from snippets of various texts. Not originally considered one of the Beat writers at all (in 1971, Bruce Cook wrote an important study of the Beat Generation in which he listed the top three Beat writers as Kerouac, Ginsberg and Gregory Corso), he is now a favorite to some, and hated by many more. Some women’s groups find him offensive (for good reason; he has published many nasty generalizations about women). In the early 90’s, there was a zine devoted exclusively to disgust with Burrough’s gender-based offenses. Source  – by Levi Asher

About Dukakis:

Since June 1991, Dukakis has been a Distinguished Professor of Political Science at Northeastern University and Visiting Professor at the School of Public Policy at UCLA. His research has focused on national health care policy reform and the lessons that national policy makers can learn from state reform efforts. Recently, he and former U.S. Senator Paul Simon authored a book entitled How to Get Into Politics-and Why which is designed to encourage young people to think seriously about politics and public service as a career.  Source

About Feinstein:

In 2000 Feinstein received a special recognition award from the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation for her work in support of breast cancer research and education. At the time, she was a member of the Senate Cancer Coalition and the National Dialogue on Cancer. She also supported a stamp to raise money specifically for breast cancer research.

Feinstein continues to be an active senator who supports the many issues that have become important to her during her decades-long career in public service. She has introduced bills to make the cloning (scientific copying) of another human being a crime, to allow local school districts to use Department of Education funding to build new and smaller schools, and to make it more difficult for terrorists to obtain weapons from the United States. Source

About Barnes:

During his six-year tenure, Mike shepherded the merger with the Million Mom March Chapters to help make our movement stronger and more effective. He oversaw our name change from Handgun Control, Inc. to the Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence and the Center to Prevent Handgun Violence to the Brady Center. Mike also led a dramatic expansion of the Brady Center’s litigation against the gun industry, leading to precedent-setting victories in the courts of New Jersey, Ohio and Indiana, court-ordered reform of gun dealers in California, and over $4 million in damages recovered for gun violence victims. Source

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