Black Creek Outfitters Guru Session – Hiking the White Mountains


Jack telling us about The Whites.
Jack telling us about The Whites.

On August 27th Black Creek Outfitters hosted a Guru Session led by Jack Stucki. The subject matter was “Hiking the White Mountains” of New Hampshire. The range consists of 48 peaks which exceed 4,000 feet known as the 4000’ers. It includes Mt. Washington, which at 6,288 feet is the highest mountain in the Northeast.

But it’s more than just numbers and names. “The Whites” are a destination for college students, adventure seekers and families.

Jack’s memories of this section of the AT are varied and happy. The kindness of the people in trail towns, the pristine upkeep of the trail and most of all the amazing views. If this is not on your bucket list it should be. The irony is that my family will be in this area for our Christmas trip. While winter in The Whites can be dangerous Jack assured us that there are still sites aplenty.

While there are many areas to hike The Whites, Jack focused on the section which he traversed while hiking the AT. Therefore the mentions, for example the notches, are not fully inclusive of all The Whites.

The Guru discussions occur every Wednesday evening, with pauses in the series based on availability as well as breaks for planning and actual outdoor adventuring. If you are in the Jacksonville area and would like a session dedicated to a specific topic you can reach out to me or ask for Jack when you visit the store.

If you see anything which you feel is incorrect I always appreciate feedback on how to improve upon, or further elaborate, the information conveyed. I have also tried to include more informative links to items noted in the session.

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Black Creek Outfitters Guru Session – Pitching a Tent


On August 7th Black Creek Outfitters hosted a Guru Session led by Jack Stucki. The subject matter was “Pitching a Tent”. A strong proponent of minimalist hiking, Jack focused less on tent manufacturers and more on proper selection and use based on the type of hiker one is. He did offer some great advice on how to handle foul weather and dark conditions. As usual he also shared some entertaining stories which enhance the education element.

Minimalist hiking is not cheap, but if you plan and save you will find the money you spend is priceless when it comes to the weight you’ll save. Before making any purchase do your research. Go to your local outfitter and let them take you through the variety of gear at your disposal.

The Guru discussions occur every Wednesday evening, with pauses in the series based on availability as well as breaks for planning and actual outdoor adventuring. If you are in the Jacksonville area and would like a session dedicated to a specific topic you can reach out to me or ask for Jack when you visit the store.

  • Our tent for this evening is the MSR Experience Series Hubba. Best names ever. Check out their site:
  • Know your trek. Car camping vs. section/through hiking. Jack’s focus is minimalist hiking, hence a minimalist style tent. Costs more, but if you’re packing it you’re getting value through less weight.
  • Todays tents are silicone impregnated nylon, significantly lighter than the days of military grade pop up tents.
  • Tents have gone from sleeves to ringlets to clips
  • Increased ground claws will allow for more space. Design idea.
  • When rain comes, find a place to wait out the weather. Taking a tent down in the rain is less a problem.
  • Suggestion: pack tent assembled so when the rain comes you have a quick setup. This is specific to fly only. Full tent enclosure is a different story.
  • Inventory your tent and perform multiple pitch and take down excercises. Be efficient before trail.
  • Prepare for the unexpected to a greater degree…do it in the dark. Don’t expect a light source.
  • Jack and his daughter set used the week before trail to practice setting up the tent twice a day.
  • “Fast fly” is the term used for pre setup.
  • Big Agnes and Marmot have this capability.
  • A bug bivy sack is an alternative to a tent if the weather is warm and you know you’ll have coverage if needed.
  • Jack warned of hiking the AT that Lyme Disease is a danger between the months of mid-June through mid-September, going from VA to VT. Make sure you have a tent with coverage for weather and insects.
  • Jack noted that buying a minimalist pack before buying the gear might not be the best idea. Minimalist packs are meant to carry minimalist gear. Whatever tent you buy consider how you’re going to carry it.
  • Set the tent up in the store before purchasing it. Completely understand the pieces and space. Where will you put your wet gear and your pack? It comes down to personal preference.
  • If you ask Jack, the best tent begins and ends with Big Agnes.

Black Creek Outfitters Guru Session: Outdoor Gear


Jack Stucki led a great discussion on new gear coming into Black Creek Outfitters. He also fielded questions on general gear options based on conditions, time on trail and durability. These are bullet item highlights of the discussion.

The Guru Discussions occur every Wednesday evening, with pauses in the series based on availability as well as breaks for planning and actual outdoor adventuring. If you are in the Jacksonville area and would like a session dedicated to a specific topic you can reach out to me or ask for Jack when you visit the store.

 

  • Footwear is the most important when it comes to fit.
  • People who wear boots tend to be older folk (Jacks notes on trail he sees people his age in boots.)
  • 40 lbs or more, consider a boot (though Jack considers 40 lbs a reason to question how the hiker has packed.)
  • Boots are good for ankle support along with snow conditions. Most boots will be water proof. Hard to find ones which aren’t. Warmth and structure are your gains.
  • Jack noted day hikes in low top shoes didn’t impact his ankles or knees so he knew the problem was weight. (Lowa boot was the session example)
  • Salomon X D is the recommended low top show.
  • They need no break-in (I can attest to that).
  • Vibram is the standard for sole, however Salomon does not use Vibram.
  • They’d prefer to not use Goretex but their contract with REI requires it.
  • Jack showed how the Salomon has a high degree of tortional rigidity: as much as the boot.
  • Climashield is Salomon’s proprietary waterproofing.
  • If Goretex gets wet on the inside, it takes a while to dry. Note that.
  • Jack has over 1,000 miles on his Salomon shoes. Salomon doesn’t promise they’ll last that long.
  • Hiker, trekker and PHD. Those are your Smartwool options. Your version is based on your environment.
  • FITS makes a light, medium and rugged sock. The mill that makes FITS used to make Smartwool. When Smartwool went to China, the mill made FITS.
  • You can’t go wrong with FITS or Smartwool.
  • But Darn Tough may be the best sock out there.
  • Jack sharing Outdoor Research Backcountry Boardshorts. Great, light weight hiking short. Feather light with some give.
  • Jack is wearing Vissla on the Wonderland Trail. Super light weight with great stretch, and quick drying.
  • 150 weight Merino wool icebreaker shirt is his go to shirt. No SPF.
  • The shirt has a tag with a number. Go to the site. Put in the number. You’ll get the location and sheep that shirt came from.
  • ExOfficio 91% polyester shirt is also a solid option. But polyester is petroleum based, if you are concerned.
  • 200 weight Merino wool Icebreaker 3/4 zip is a solid long sleeve base layer.
  • 200 weight Merino wool Icebreaker “long johns” pants are the complete package.
  • Comparing fleece anything to the Arc’Teryx Atom jacket. Spend the extra money and go with the Atom.
  • OR rain gear from 2 weeks ago was our example of the rain proof outer layer.
  • Looking at OR Versaliner gloves. Cool zipper for glove rain cover.

Clear Sky Friday – Seeing Good 17/01


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Last night my son was part of a two-man presentation at our local outdoor store where he works, Black Creek Outfitters. Along with Jack Stucki they spent a good two hours detailing their respective adventures on the Pacific Crest and Appalachian Trail. The presentation topics included gear, food and mindset. On a personal note it was a proud moment through which I observed my son sharing his passion in a professional atmosphere.

One comment that Jack made stood out, and it greatly serves Clear Sky Friday, was inspired/taken from Zach Davis’s book Appalachian Trials. Part of Jack’s closing comments to the audience centered around why one might commit themselves to months on trail, a question Mr. Davis writes about as being elemental to answering if one is to best maximize the adventure. With my longest section hike being four days, the “why” of an extended hike had never been considered beyond the answer “I just like to hike”.

Both Jack and Evan, when speaking of memories, found that the community of hikers was a grand emotional monolith. From Trail Angels to a simple person willing to give a tired hiker a ride, the basic good you find while on trail is special. Being a hopeful cynic, this is what my “why” would be. To see the good in humanity. Yes it exists apart from trail, but the quiet of the hike along with the kindness of strangers amplifies it.

With that in mind, here is an article which reminds us that good is all around us if we just look for it. Link courtesy of Sustainable Man via Facebook.

http://www.world-actuality.com/index.php/people/671-these-20-photos-are-going-to-make-you-cry-but-you-ll-see-why-it-s-totally-worth-it